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Israel Notebooking Page

Israel Notebooking PageThis free Israel notebooking page can be used to write about the country of Israel.
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Iraq Notebooking Page

Iraq Notebooking PageThis free notebooking page can be used to write about the country of Iraq.
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Iran Notebooking Page

Iran Notebooking PageUse this free homeschool notebooking page to write about the the country of Iran.  You could include demographics, political information, topographical information, or other statistics about Iran. [Read more…]

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Gaza Strip Notebooking Page

Gaza Strip NotebookingThis free homeschool notebooking page can be used to write about the Gaza Strip.
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Egypt Notebooking Page

Egypt Notebooking Page

Use this free homeschool notebooking page to write about Egypt.   [Read more…]

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Afghanistan Notebooking Page

Afghanistan Notebooking Page
Use this free homeschool notebooking page to write about Afghanistan.   [Read more…]

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Election 2016 Notebooking Page

2016 Presidential ElectionUse this free homeschool election notebooking page to write about the presidential candidates.  We have other election pages including electoral college, who gets to vote, how the president is elected, and more. [Read more…]

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United States Capitol Notebooking Page

United States Capitol Notebooking PageUse this free notebooking page while studying Washington, D.C. and its memorials in your homeschool.  The Capitol Building is the home to the United States Congress.

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Parliamentary Procedure Lapbook

Parliamentary Procedure Lapbook

Parliamentary procedures help establish a process for conducting business in a group. The process is used to help a group come to a decision in a fair manner. It also helps a group to stay focused and resolve issues.  In this free Parliamentary Procedure lapbook, you will learn about Robert’s rules of order and how to implement them in a meeting.

How to Fold a Lapbook

Library List:
Robert’s Rules of Order by Henry M. Robert
Complete Idiots Guide to Robert’s Rules by Nancy Sylvester PRP, CPP-T

Activities:

Most Noted Parliamentarians: Henry M. Robert, originally published 1876, 4th edition 1915, still in print with 10th edition 2000. Alice Sturgis, originally published 1950, American Institute of Parliamentarians is still making revisions. George Demeter, originally published 1948; Paul Mason originally published 1935; Hugh Cannon originally published 1992.

Robert’s Rules: Henry Martyn Robert 1837-1923 was a general in the U.S. Army. He researched parliamentary procedure after being elected chairman of a group. He found many discrepancies in the existing books and decided to simplify the procedure. Many groups still use his rules to conduct their meetings today.

Famous Quote: “Where there is no law, but every man does what is right in his own eyes, there is the least of real liberty.” Henry M. Robert, December 1875

Interesting Fact: Parliamentary Procedure is adaptable for different size groups. The larger the group the more formal the meeting should be but always consider “what is the fairest thing to do in this situation?” Remember to apply this to all and not just yourself.

Download (PDF, 1.52MB)

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United States Flag Lapbook

us_flagHow did the United States flag come into being?  Why does it look the way it does?  Who made the first flag?  You will learn the answer to all of these questions and more in this free United States flag lapbook.

How to Fold a Lapbook

Websites:
Betsy Ross – UsHistory.org
Betsy Ross – Wikipedia

Activities:
American Flag Then & Now – Cut out along the solid outer lines. Fold one short edge in toward the center along the dotted line; fold the other short edge in toward the center along the dotted line. Using printouts from enchantedlearning.com, show the flag in 1777 versus the flag of today. At Enchanted Learning, you can get a printout of the Thirteen Colonies Flag versus the current flag.

Why Is the Flag Called Old Glory? – Cut out along the solid outer lines. Fold in half along the center dotted line with the text to the outside. Write the answer under the flap. The answer can be found at Betsy Ross’ FAQ(at the bottom of the page)

Flag Representations – Cut out along the solid outer lines. Shutter-fold the short edges in toward the center along the dotted lines with the text on the outside. Fold the entire unit in half along the dotted line. Open and cut along the short solid lines to form four flaps. Refold. Write the answers to the questions under each flap. The answers can be found at Betsy Ross’ FAQ

Why are the stars in a circle? – Cut out along the solid outer lines. Fold down along the dotted line. Then Fold along the double dotted line so that the text is to the outside. Write the answer under the flap. The answer can be found at Betsy Ross’ FAQ

Five-Point Star – Cut out along the solid outer lines. Fold the narrow flaps in along the dotted lines. Glue the flaps to the folder to form a pocket. Cut out a five-point star and put it in your envelope.

Betsy Ross – Cut out along the solid outer lines. Put them in order. Put the title page on top. Staple them at the bottom. Glue back to the folder. Answer the question that is on each flap. The answers can be found at Betsy Ross: Her Life

Five Point Star Story – Cut out along the solid outer lines. Fold in half along the center dotted line with the text to the outside. Record the story about the five-point star.

How to Display the Flag – (print 2) – Cut out all shapes along the solid outer lines and punch holes in each. Stack them up with the title page on top. Fasten them together with a brass fastener. They will now be like a fan Record as many of the ways to display the flag as you want. The 14 different ways to display the flag can be found at Flag Rules and Regulations

Related Pages:
U.S. Flag Unit Study
Flag Notebooking Page

Download (PDF, 236KB)